Digital Drugs

Picture this:  a teenager with an MP3 player, wearing headphones, listening to a certain type of music – getting high off the sound of the music.  Sounds crazy, right?  Actually, there IS a phenomenon out there called “digital drugs” or “I-dosing.”  A few weeks ago, I was talking to an elementary principal who asked me if I had heard about digital drugs.  I initially thought she was joking, but she informed me that during one of their professional development days, a speaker brought up digital drugs amongst our youth.  The speaker told the audience that a school district in North Dakota was having such a problem with this phenomenon that the school banned students from bringing MP3 players and headphones into the building.

I had not heard of the term digital drugs before, and was shocked that such a thing existed.  I learned that kids go to certain websites to download a certain “binaural beat.”  Binaural beat technology works by presenting tones in each ear separately at slightly different frequencies, creating a phenomenon that alters brainwaves, which in some cases, may create a “high.”

Experts are concerned by this behavior, because they believe that if you have kids exploring this phenomenon, you probably have a kid who may end up smoking marijuana or looking for bigger things – making binaural beat music a “gateway drug,” if you will.  The other concern is that when kids go to these websites to download this music, there is usually some advertisement for other drugs, such as fake marijuana.  One of the most popular websites is I-Doser.com.  To actually see kids participating in this, check out YouTube.

It is hard to believe, that because of technology, kids can find an online dealer and hook them up with digital drugs that get them high through their headphones.

As a parent myself, I wanted to pass this information on.  Sometimes it is an exhausting task as a parent trying to keep up with the latest treads that involve our youth, but we must stay ahead of the curve.

‘til next time…

(By Officer Tim Reopelle, School Resource Officer, North High School)